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The Edward Durtschi Sr. Family Story
Chapter 11

IN TRIBUTE

        This final chapter contains the feelings of respect and admiration of the original authors for those whom they wrote about. It is hoped the following passages will be a worthy memorial of the lives of the Edward Durtschi, Sr. family, and the heritage they left us.

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        Clara remembers her father, Edward, Sr., as a good, kind man. "He didn't believe in using a stick on us for punishment. All he had to do was look at us a certain way and we knew he meant what he said. Yet even though he was firm he did it with kindness and we all loved him. Mother was very good too. We often sang together. We took turns reading from the Bible. Mother and Father taught us to love the Lord. We believed and knew we had a Father in Heaven and that His Son Jesus the Christ was our Redeemer. Father was loved and respected by all for his honest dealings. He considered our ideas and feelings when problems came up. Our ideas were considered in making decisions. Father was a great man with a keen sense of humor. Mother was a courageous woman who had a kind, steadying influence on the entire family. They were wonderful parents, God's gift to a big family.
        "And now, all of his children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and on down the line, are all recipients of the wonderful heritage they have left us. Not a heritage of wealth, but of blessings everlasting. These are blessings that come of hard work, and spirituality in the home. Blessings of courage to do that which was right regardless of the consequences. These gifts are ours today because they wanted to leave for their posterity a legacy of a better and easier life than they had. There are no greater stories of faith and courage written than this of our parents, Edward and Rosina Durtschi. From their posterity have come a hundred missionaries who have traveled throughout the world teaching the gospel of Jesus Christ. Half that many servicemen have served in the armed forces protecting the freedom of our country. We can all be proud to belong to this noble family tree."

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        Lee Bybee, who married into the Kaufman family said of Rosa, "She was a woman who appreciated her family and oh, how her family appreciate her. She was extremely patient and understanding. Rosa was thrifty, and yet the soul of generosity. She was thankful for her health and her ability to work. And what a variety of talents she had. From working as a man in the fields and stables to the tender touch of a nurse caring for the sick: from making an addition to the chicken coop to baking a flaky, delectable pie crust. The Kaufman children were surely blessed with a wonderful mother.
        God rest you, Rosina Kathrina Kaufman and keep you in his care."

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        "We, the children of Fred and Caroline Feuz, pay tribute to our parents, tribute to their labors, and tribute to their integrity," Caroline (Lena) Oliver said, "in the continuity of life, we hope we do honor to them.
        "Looking at the descendants of Caroline Durtschi and Fred Feuz, the children, grand-children and great grandchildren, we see many of their physical characteristics. All of them today remember these grandparents, and their patience and good humor. We also remember the ranch, and though it is no longer there, the place where it stood in the shadow of the Tetons has become a very special sanctuary. It is now a place of peace and reverence where the Feuz family go to touch their origins. It is the one spot that will always remain the corporal home of our family.


        "As we look at Fred and Caroline's vast posterity, we find the self-reliance, the creativeness, the same devotion to each other and their fellow creatures as these two first parents had. Yes, Caroline and Fred, you have been blessed indeed in this land of your adoption, which you both loved so sincerely.
        "Of course, happiness was not constantly found at the Feuz home, and like the chronicle of these few years, if like the sundial, we have recorded only sunny hours, that, too, is a Feuz trait."

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        Laverne, Edward, Jr., and Elizabeth's daughter, stated, "The Edward Durtschi, Sr., family could be trusted. Their reputation was that their word was as good as their bond. And Edward Durtschi, Jr.'s, reputation was no exception. He was a tall, well-built man, full of vim and vigor.
        "In a few short years Ed, Alfred, and John, had as monuments to their muscle, brawn, and brain, each his own large barn all completed. Fred figured into all this even though he didn't get a barn, but we hope he knew his skills were appreciated.
        "Mother (Elizabeth) was a woman of faith. Her prayers were truly answered as she faced the problems before her. Many times, after taking a certain course of action that she felt she was guided into, time proved that the decision was a wise one. Things did turn out well. In the end, she had reached the goals she had set for herself: to get a substantial amount of genealogy gathered, to get each of the children into a profession that would give them a livelihood, and to support three of her five children on missions.
        "As we look back now, we doubt that Mother and her little crew would have survived, had it not been for the protection and convenience of the mighty structure that was ours. Their priorities were kept straight. During those days there was an oft-quoted adage:
        'A barn will get you a house
        but
        A house won't get you a barn."
        Laverne added, "As someone has put it: 'How do you express all the joys, sadness, enthusiasms, and dreams of a lifetime in words?' Think of the history that has been made, since the days the Durtschis were moved upon to accept Mormonism. They left their homeland, and accepted the challenges of a new life! Might we say of the progeny, most have followed in the steps of their fore bearers. They have lived the Gospel, and formed a bulwark of good citizens of a land that President Ezra Taft Benson has called, 'the Lord's base of operations in these latter days'. So, if we are to justify their sacrifices, then we will honor them by accepting the challenges of our day. Must we be reminded that each one of us, here today, could very well be a citizen of a land not so blessed as America!"

* * *


        Belden remembers his father, Fredrick Durtschi, as a man who was always willing to share what little he had with others.
        "If we gain no more from Dad than a deeper appreciation and gratitude for the sacrifices that our forefathers have made so we can enjoy the bounties of modern days, then his life would not have been in vain. But we can learn much more than this if we will. May God grant that we may honor this noble spirit by dedicating our lives to the highest principles which governed his best moments.
        "There are different scales on which fame is measured," Beldon continued, "But we boys have surely been blessed and have tried to honor our father and mother.
        "It was mentioned earlier in the story how we boys looked upon one of Dad's kisses as an ordeal because of his mustache. Now, I think any of us would dearly appreciate experiencing another of his loving kisses.
        "Nearly all men wish to leave some sort of monument behind to witness to future generations that their time on earth had not been in vain. Dad's monuments are many. His four boys were probably his proudest works, at least he was surely proud of them and grateful for them. He also created a great number of physical monuments in the form of a great variety of structures either completely or partially built by his hand. One of his earlier projects, for example, was a concrete head gate on an irrigation ditch in Midway, Utah. I just happened to stumble onto this a few years ago and recognized it as Dad's workmanship because of the quality and by his initials inscribed in the concrete.
        "So Dad's monuments still stand as a witness to one who would not compromise his principles just to please man. He gained the greatest satisfaction from doing a job well."

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        To the remaining members of this first family who were not mentioned in this section, let me say they were not a bit behind the others in following the footsteps of their father and mother, Edward and Rosina.
        May we, as offspring of this great family, follow in their footsteps. Let us carry on the proud tradition of walking uprightly before God, and serving Him in a manner pleasing to Him. Life is indeed a challenge. What we become will be determined by those day by day decisions we make now. And the decisions we make today will have a lasting effect, not only on our own lives, but on the lives of our posterity. In fact, the stories in this book are great examples of this principal. May we make the proper decisions to live life as fully as they did.
        I suppose in future times, generations yet unborn may look at our lives through such a work as this. Let that record display lives of success, accomplishment, and integrity. And as we live faithful lives in this life of adversity, perhaps it will give them the strength to carry on, to win their own life's battles. (Dated 19 May, 1987)

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This work Copyright 1987 for the Durtschi Family by Mark Durtschi.
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